12 Days of Christmas Books

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How to Celebrate Who You Are By Janis Cox

Is there a time when you have felt unloved?
Have you felt that you are not good enough?
Or you have wanted to be or act like someone else?

Children have the same struggles. That’s how competition makes for hurt feelings and inadequacy.

Tadeo Turtle is a little colourful turtle who loves life – until he sees Sammy squirrel climbing a tree and starts to envy his way of life. Join Tadeo on his journey of self-discovery. He learns a lesson that we all need to learn – God loves us, just the way He made us.

Acceptance of who you are leads to many positive characteristics. So no matter what age you are this book has a lesson for you.

Created for ages newborn until 6, Tadeo Turtle has become a best-loved book.

There are children’s activities and research ideas in the back of the book.

Happy readers have said,

 “I bought these [Janis has 2 books] for my grand-nieces a couple of years ago. They’re not book kids, but they loved these. Their mom says they still read them!’ – Bobbi Junior

“May we accept this beautiful gift as Tadeo learned to do. This short book has a lesson for children and adults alike. How often do we wish we were like someone else or had things that others have? Tadeo Turtle is a simple rhyming story for the young. Janis Cox illustrated the animals and scenes in luscious, colorful watercolors. They are so beautifully painted.” Amazon customer

To get a copy: Canadian Amazon

US Amazon

Available in paperback or Kindle. Alternately you can contact me and I will send you one. Email Janis Cox.

Janis-web-ready

http://www.janiscox.com

Janis started writing in her journal as a way to learn more about her faith. She is an award-winning author/illustrator of Tadeo Turtle and The Kingdom of Thrim. She podcasts on Hope Stream Radio. Her talk Growing Through God’s Word can be heard each Tuesday. Janis is also an artist and her art is showcased in the Rails End Gallery, Haliburton, Ontario. She is a creative catalyst who encourages Christians to study God’s word through creativity. Janis lives in Haliburton with her husband and her dog, Snowball.

12 Days of Christmas Books

Bullet BossesGrab the Next Rung On Your Career Ladder

Bullets and Bosses Don’t Have Friends, How To Navigate Tough Challenges at Work  by Toni Crowe is a book about learning to be the best you can be at work.

Discover how to handle tough peers and tougher bosses from one of America’s top Executives.

With a honest, compelling look at relationships with peers and bosses alike, discover a pragmatic approach to mastering your trek through management. You will navigate common challenges in the workplace and conquer them with your personal style.

What Will YOU Learn

In Bullets and Bosses Don’t Have Friends, you’ll discover:

– A behind-the-scenes peek at corporate America that shows you what it’s really like at the top

– Which skills and attitudes you need to scale to the top of the business world

– How to cultivate a relationship with your boss that benefits both of you

– What you can do when confronted with difficult peers so you maintain control

– How you can and should deal with workplace treachery, and much, much more!

Bullets and Bosses Don’t Have Friends is a series of true stories from Toni Crowe’s life in the corporate world, each with a practical lesson and a set of exercises you can apply to your own career. If you like the personal approach of a mentor, tales of hard-won success, and real-world advice from a CEO with an amazing record of achievement, then you’ll love Toni Crowe’s latest book.  third installment in the five-part My Journey from a Lady of the Night to the Lady of the Boardroom memoir!

 

Excerpt from Bullets and Bosses ***

Many people believe that being the boss is easy. It is not. There are numerous activities that are hidden from the everyday employee that would shock them.

I was working for a toxic boss on a large, important project. The project involved castings, which are made by pouring liquid metal into a mold. Manufacturing parts with precision dimensions using this process is something of a magic trick. To add to the challenge, we didn’t have molds for this project.

Normally, from start to finish, a casting takes about thirty weeks. We had to make the part samples ourselves, check them, send them to a supplier for machining, check them again, and then send them to a supplier for painting.

We developed a plan for the parts to travel from one supplier to the next, cutting us out as the middleman and bringing the lead time down from thirty weeks to twenty-five. On this project, those five weeks could make a huge difference to the production team, which wanted to get the sample parts back in-house as fast as they could to build up, first, the production prototype and then the units themselves.

Both the production team and the parts procurement team reported directly to me. Despite enormous effort on my part and theirs, the parts did not come in at twenty-five weeks. They came in at twenty-six weeks.

They were one week late.

The day the parts were due but did not show up, my boss stormed into my office. His face was red, he was breathing hard, and his hands were clenched into tight fists. He walked straight toward me, and for a moment, I thought he might punch me.

He climbed up on my desk and started kicking. He kicked my phone off the desk, then my paper clips, then my calendar.

I didn’t get out of my seat. I just rolled my chair back against the wall while he was up on my desk kicking things around, hoping I didn’t get hit by anything. I was stunned into silence. He was not a skinny man. How upset was he to climb on my desk?

When he had finally kicked everything off, he stared at me. “What was the timeline for this project?”

I told him, “The schedule was thirty weeks.”

He didn’t like that answer. “What did you tell me you and your team could do?”

“I told you we could get it down to twenty-five weeks.”

“Did you get it down to twenty-five weeks?”

“No,” I told him, “I did not. I got it down to twenty-six weeks. I apologize for missing the plan by a week and only being four weeks ahead of the original schedule.”

This appeared to calm him down a bit. He climbed off my desk.

“Engineering is now behind twelve weeks, and you have only made up nine. I want you to see what you can do to make up the last three weeks we need to be on schedule for this project.”

I stood up and pretended that my desk items were not scattered about on the floor.

“Sure. I’ll make that happen.”

My ability to “make that happen” was one of the reasons I did so well in my career. My second ability to stay calm and take the heat was the second. If you work in manufacturing, operations, or supply chains, there are multiple problems you must solve every day. When you are responsible for all of the parts that are needed to produce revenue products, 99.9% is not good enough. If the plant needs one million parts and you and your team provide 999,999, you have failed.

Manufacturing and Operations are tough gigs. Sometimes, no matter what you achieve, it is never enough.

End Excerpt ***

Crowe

Toni Crowe, BSEE, MSM, CLA, PE is the bestselling author of the $7 Journey series.

She is an award winning and accomplished executive with 30 years of experience as a CEO/President, Vice-President, Director, Engineer, and Manager across multiple sectors including high tech, consumer and nuclear sensors, Aerospace,  film production and glass.

Toni has extensive experience in P&L, Manufacturing, Operations Management, and Lean.  She has participated in a number of mergers and acquisitions.

Toni is currently the CEO of  Just One,  her company which is dedicated to changing lives, one life at a time, by insuring that no one has to make the same mistakes she made.

 

Buy Bullets and Bosses Don’t Have Friends to grab hold of the next rung on your career ladder today. https://smile.amazon.com/Bullets-Bosses-Dont-Have-Friends-ebook/dp/B07JH6W8XH

 

12 Days of Christmas Books

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Be Strong in the LORD

By Ruth L. Snyder

“Trust in the LORD and do good; dwell in the land and enjoy safe pasture. Delight yourself in the LORD and he will give you the desires of your heart. Commit your way to the LORD; trust in him and he will do this: He will make your righteousness shine like the dawn, the justice of your cause like the noonday sun.”

—Psalm 37:3-6

I started my morning with prayer and Scripture reading. My heart was especially burdened for our family. I prayed for God’s protection and was quiet before God. My heart was filled with peace when my devotional time was finished. Less than an hour later, my husband and I were embroiled in a heated disagreement regarding our children. The longer we talked, the more we disagreed. I retreated to my piano to play hymns and reflect. Why couldn’t we resolve this situation? Kendall and I both want the best for our children, but sometimes we disagree about what this looks like. We are learning to use tools like John Gottman’s Sound Relationship House (https://www.gottman.com/about/the-gottman-method/).

Life on earth is full of challenges and problems. Sometimes we get totally overwhelmed. Cancer. Addiction. Family issues. War. Abuse. God is the only one who is big enough, wise enough, to have the solutions. We need to choose to be strong in HIM. He will give us the victory, if we trust him and not ourselves.

According to Strong’s Concordance, the phrase, “be strong,” comes from a root word that means to enable, empower, strengthen, or be made strong. Remember the apostle, Paul? We may see him as a spiritual giant, but he claims that God’s strength is best displayed in our areas of weakness.

When we feel strong, we don’t rely on God the way we should. In fact, when we have the ability to do things well, we often boast and become proud. When we realize we are weak, God is able to work through us to display his love and power to those around us (1 Corinthians 1:26-31; 2 Corinthians 12:9). Here are some examples from Scripture:

  • God enabled Samson to defeat Israel’s enemies, but when Samson chose to disobey God, he was captured (Judges 14-16).
  • God chose Saul to be King. When Samuel took a while to show up, Saul took things into his own hands. Then he disobeyed by not destroying all of the enemy, and God took the kingdom from his son and gave it to a lowly shepherd boy, David (I Samuel 9, 13, 15).

Think About It

Have you experienced God’s power in your daily living? What difference is it making in your life? Journal your thoughts, or respond in another way that is meaningful to you.

Prayer

Dear Heavenly Father,

Thank you that you are all-powerful. Help me to remember that without you I am vulnerable and weak.  As I walk through this day, lead me. Help me to be sensitive to your voice and obedient to your will. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

 

Ruth would like to invite you to join a FREE 10-Day devotional challenge. You will receive 10 free devotionals and access to a private Facebook group to discuss the devotionals, apply them to your life, and pray.

https://equipped.lpages.co/equipped-10-day-devotional-challenge/

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Ruth L. Snyder resides near Glendon, Alberta, along with her husband and five children. Ruth enjoys writing articles, devotionals, short stories, and Christian fiction. Ruth is Past President of InScribe Christian Writers’ Fellowship.

 

12 Days of Christmas Books

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Click on cover to purchase

What do zombie parents, one-eyed dolls, and leftover lasagna have in common? Find out in this LAUGH-OUT-LOUD Christmas book for kids ages 9-12.

Brad Finkley is an ordinary kid who seems doomed to have the worst Christmas break ever.

This eBook is perfect for your kid’s reading list over Christmas break. Hilarious, funny, and super engaging. Sure to become a family favorite!

 

Sample from the book:

I felt a small lurch in my stomach as I looked at all that goopy, white frosting dripping off of the cupcakes. The leftover pizza smelled like stinky feet, so I moved my desk away a few inches.

I closed my eyes and tried to think about nothing, but the song “Ice, Ice, Baby” kept playing over and over in my head, which usually meant I was going to throw up.

My stomach started making noises like an Orca as I miserably wiped my nose on the sleeve of my scratchy sweater.

My teacher, Mr. Will, was trying to get everyone to sing Christmas Carols. He was wearing a Santa Hat that had a dirty looking beard attached to it. (Only the girls were singing.)

Finally, after painfully enduring the seventh round of “Jingle Bells Batman Smells,” our class was dismissed.

It was Christmas break!

*****

JenniferWaddleAuthorPhotoFromHerDoc

Jennifer Waddle considers herself a Kansas girl, married to a Colorado hunk, with a heart to encourage women everywhere. She is the author of several books, including Prayer WORRIER: Turning Every Worry into Powerful Prayer, and is a regular contributor for LifeWay, Crosswalk, and Abide. Jennifer’s online ministry is EncouragementMama.com, where you can find her books and sign up for her Encourage Letter, “Discouragement Doesn’t Win.” She resides with her family near the foothills of the Rocky Mountains—her favorite place on earth.

 

Purchase Worst Christmas Break Ever here

 

 

Love in the Room

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The symbols and images of Christmas can slip by us because they are so familiar. In Love In The Room, award winning author, Marcia Lee Laycock, brings those images into focus once again as she explores the true meaning of the season. These short devotionals will stir readers to ponder the Christ child with depth and clarity.

Here’s an excerpt from one of the devotionals in Love in the Room:

The Promise of Christmas

Chaos reigned supreme. That’s how it seemed as we rehearsed our Christmas play. The first rehearsal didn’t really happen. The second one was only a bit better, and three quarters of the cast didn’t make it to the third. Those of us who were supposedly “in control” wondered if we were going to have a play at all.

That was nothing new. Every year it seems to happen. Kids run helter-skelter, some don’t show up, some can’t find costumes or those made for them don’t fit. The choir director is tearing her hair out This year seemed a bit more chaotic than usual. But somehow it all came together in the end. The night of the performance seemed to go well. I say seemed, because I was too busy trying to keep my “cast” quiet and focused, to notice if the play was working. One of the magi discovered he could use one of the shepherd’s headbands as a slingshot to wing the beads off his crown clear across the front of the church. That delighted the kids in the front row who dashed out to pick them up. Mary couldn’t stop squirming because her costume was made of wool, and Joseph kept changing his mind about which robe fit best – right up until he walked out onto the ‘stage.’

I wasn’t sure it had really all come together until the audience stood to applaud at the end. When many congratulated us on a job well done, all I could say was, “It’s a miracle!”

And that’s the promise of Christmas – it all comes together in the end. I’m sure the followers of Jesus, watching the drama of His life and death, felt the same way we ‘directors’ did. To those who thought they were in control, it looked like chaos reigned. From the moment of His birth, He and His parents had to run from those who wanted to kill Him. As He performed miracles, religious leaders plotted against Him. Even the disciples themselves didn’t understand His message. They were disappointed that He didn’t chase the Romans out of the country; He never did set up an earthly kingdom. Then, the cross. It looked like everything they tried to accomplish was doomed to fail. But in the end …

In the end, the stone was rolled away. The baby born in a stable and crucified on a cross was raised glorified, to the glory of His Father.

And there is another promise yet to unfold. As the birth of Christ is overshadowed by the cross, which was blasted away by his resurrection, even that will be outdone by His return. One day, God has told us, “Before me every knee will bow; by me every tongue will swear. They will say of me, ‘In the Lord alone are righteousness and strength’.” (Isaiah 45:23,24)

It will be a miracle and it really will all come together in the end.

****

About Marcia Lee Laycock

Marcia’s work has been published in magazines, newspapers and anthologies in both Canada and the U.S. and appears frequently on the world wide web. She currently writes a regular devotional column, The Spur, which appears in publications across Canada and goes out by e-mail to avid readers. Marcia’s writing has won many prizes, garnering praise from notable Christian writers like Janette Oke, Mark Buchanan, Phil Callaway and Sigmund Brouwer. She has published four devotional books, six novels and many short stories. Marcia won the Best New Canadian Christian Author Award for her novel, One Smooth Stone. The sequel, A Tumbled Stone was short-listed for a Word award along with her fantasy novel, Journey to a Strong Tower. Marcia is also a sought-after speaker for women’s events. To learn more about Marcia’s writing and speaking ministry visit her online at www.marcialeelaycock.com

Front cover

To purchase Love in the Room by Marcia Lee Laycock go to Amazon.com or Amazon.ca

Or, if you live in Canada, order directly from the author by emailing marcia@marcialeelaycock.com

 

 

Wish Lists and Other Annoying Things

Wish List

“Do we really have to do this?” My husband sounded a little annoyed.

“Well, it’s what we agreed to,” I said.

He sighed and explained that he just doesn’t like the idea of making a wish list for Christmas. “Where’s the fun in that?” he asked. “Then you know what you’re going to get.”

I admitted I could see his point, but at the same time, wish lists do make it easier for everyone to buy Christmas gifts that everyone really wants, avoiding disappointment. Or, as my dear son-in-law once put it, “No crap, please.”

And I knew what was behind my husband’s words. He couldn’t think of anything to put on his list! Gift buying and receiving does seem to be getting harder now that our kids are grown and we are in the stage of life where we’re starting to think of down-sizing. They seem to have almost everything they could ever possibly need or want and so do we. We have discussed the idea of not giving gifts at all, but that doesn’t really sit well with anyone. We all love giving and receiving.

But sometimes it can all seem like a chore.

Sometimes all those spiritual “disciplines” we are supposed to keep up with – going to church, praying, reading our Bible – can all seem like chores too, instead of things we want to do. Somehow we’ve lost the want to, lost the joy that used to be there.

So, what to do?

Maybe it’s time to put it all aside for a time, investigate the reason for it all. Why do we give gifts at Christmas? Because we love our family members and friends and want to show them how much we appreciate them. Maybe the place to start is not with a gift list of things but a list of those things we love about them.

Why do we go to church, pray and read our Bible? Because we love Jesus and want to allow His love to flow through us. Maybe the place to start isn’t with a spiritual to-do list but with a true appreciation for the Giver of all gifts.

Maybe it’s time to look behind all the tinsel and toys too, and grasp once again the astounding love of a God who would leave all His power and position behind to become a small helpless babe wrapped in swaddling cloths.

Maybe that alone would bring all the joy and ‘want-to’ back, not only to the Christmas season, but to our very lives.

 “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace” (Isaiah 9:6)